New clubs come to GHC

Students (from left) Bethany Evans, Greggory Karnes and Andrew “Red” Jayne bring in the noise at Floyd. Photo by Ryan Jones.

Four new clubs are being added at Georgia Highlands. Overall, these clubs cover interests such as sports, faith and community.

Circle K, one of the new clubs, operates on three primary ideas: service, leadership and fellowship.

Juliana Breithaupt, director of adult and service learning and head of the potential GHC branch of Circle K International (CKI), describes this organization as “the ideal organization for those students who are looking to share their passion for service while learning essential leadership skills that will help them become future leaders in their own communities.”

At press-time, Circle K had not yet received approval as a club. John Spranza, student life coordinator at the Floyd campus, notes that the delay is due to CKI being an international organization with more than 12,600 members in 17 nations, and a potential branch must be proven to meet international requirements.

Noise Society is another new club at Georgia Highlands College. In describing itself on its Facebook page, the club gives its mission statement: “For sound fanatics and noisemakers at Georgia Highlands College.”

Greg Karnes, a psychology major at the Floyd campus and president of Noise Society, said, “Bring your batteries and your wallwarts and leave your negative attitude at home.”

Andrew “Red” Jayne, vice president of the club and chemistry major at Floyd, added, “All you need to have is an interest in electronic music.”

Everyone is welcome to join the Noise Society in the Solarium on the Floyd Campus on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 12:30 p.m.

Another new club, the GHC cheerleaders, was approved last semester, but this fall marks the first semester of activity for the squad. Megan Davidson, bursar and cheerleading coach, believes the environment allows members to “socialize in a positive atmosphere.”

Stephanie Loveless, senior accountant and assistant coach and Davidson compare their contrasting specialities. Loveless focuses on training the squad to work as a team, while Davidson’s focus is on individual members.

This organization has the most confirmed members of the four new groups with 12 cheerleaders, one alternate, and a mascot. Expect to seethe mascot at every home game this season. Davidson noted that there probably will not be any halftime shows this semester.

Students wishing to join the Cheerleading Club should contact Davidson at mdavidso@highlands.edu. Practices are held Monday and Wednesday from 3:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. in the Floyd gym.

Another new club at GHC is CRU, or Campus Crusade for Christ. Students attending the Cartersville campus are invited to join this club in worship and fellowship.

Clubs serve to connect like-minded individuals, Spranza states, “Student organizations are an important aspect of the college environment.” Membership, he adds, can strengthen leadership skills.

Homework, classes and studying are important for being successful in school; however Spranza assures students that “College is about having fun sometimes!”